For Teachers

Lynden offers a range of professional development opportunities for K-12 educators, from the intensive, cross-disciplinary Innovative Educators Institute; to a series of creative hands-on workshops developed by teachers, for teachers; to discounts on our artist-led workshops.

Lynden operates as a laboratory that creates, supports, and shares experiences at the intersection of art, nature, and culture. Partnering with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Art Education program, Milwaukee Public Schools, and others, we have used Lynden’s unique resources to develop a place-based approach to K-12 education informed by critical aesthetic pedagogy and principles of attentive living derived from an in-depth exploration of place. This place-based approach is supported by a relational learning space that extends from Lynden to the classroom, encompassing the exchanges between the two, and that integrates outdoor education, hands-on art-making, and an experiential learning process that encourages children to reflect on their “doing.”

Lynden is a partner in ArtsECO, and our professional development programs are designed for art educators and classroom and content area teachers who are committed to teaching through the arts. We support cross-disciplinary curriculum development; provide tools (field trips, artist residencies) that enhance arts-integrated teaching; nurture teacher-as-artist practices through engagement with artists at Lynden and in the classroom; and create staff positions and establish networks that support teachers as they develop their competence and confidence to teach through the arts.

We believe that teacher-as-artist practices--making time for art (whatever the discipline) and reinvigorating one's personal art practice--have a positive impact on teachers and teaching. It is in this spirit that we offer these teacher professional development opportunities.

Innovative Educators Institute

Educator Discounts on Workshops

INNOVATIVE EDUCATORS INSTITUTE
Admission to the Innovative Educators Institute (IEI) is by invitation. If you are interested in participating, please contact Anna Grosch at agrosch@lyndensculpturegarden.org

Lynden has been working with UWM's Art Education program for several years to develop a place-based K-12 curriculum that focuses on the intersection of art, nature, and culture, providing hands-on experiences that integrate Lynden’s collection of monumental outdoor sculpture and temporary installations with the natural ecology of the site. Thanks to the generous support of the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation, we have been able to build the IEI into an intensive, hands-on, year-round professional teacher development experience that brings together pre-service, early-career, and veteran teachers with artists, Lynden staff, and university faculty to test approaches to sustaining and supporting early-career (years 1-5) teachers who are committed to teaching through the arts.

The institute runs in three-year cycles, and is built around cross-disciplinary, school-based teams. These teams are typically made up of an art educator and one or two generalists or teachers with other academic specializations. The focus is on developing and sharing interdisciplinary, arts-integrated strategies and methodologies that are easily adapted to the classroom. We also support teacher-as-artist practices through the IEI; provide resources and opportunities to the classrooms of participating teachers, such as hands-on field trips to Lynden and school-based residencies with Institute artists; and work closely with teachers to develop unique programs to support their individual teaching experience.

Each year the Institute is built around a different theme.

2022: Cultivating Ecologies of Care
Faculty members: Rina Kundu Little, Liz Rex
Additional Instructors: Anna Grosch, Claudia Orjuela
Participating artists: Daniel Minter, Reggie Wilson, Arianne King Comer, Open Kitchen (Rudy Medina and Alyx Christensen), LaNia Sproles, Molly Hassler
Art Educator in Residence: Katie Hobday

The 2022 Innovative Educators Institute (IEI) and reconvening meetings will continue our exploration of the theme of “cultivation,” planned in conjunction with Lynden’s two-year Call & Response project with artist Daniel Minter, In the Healing Language of Trees: A Natural Act of Transformation Restructured for Curing Many Ills. Last year, the IEI focused on cultivation's positive transformative qualities in relation to art and nature, specifically creating gestures for imagined futures through drawing, carving, printing, storytelling, and curricula. Art cultivates by creating new worlds where materials are used to bring to life previously unseen realities and alternative social, cultural, and spatial formations. We also used the social and material practices of art, harvesting of plants, and foodways to investigate how to organize, nurture, build, and re-imagine our surroundings differently in relation to humans and nonhumans.

This year’s IEI investigates how to cultivate ecologies of care through encounter. Affective encounters are a crucial part of our knowledge production because they highlight the feelings of the other and for the other. It is a communal process of becoming that involves witnessing, testifying, sharing, and exchanging. What relationships do we want with others and why? We will begin by working with choreographer Reggie Wilson, and will then continue to carve, but this time on three-dimensional wooden beads that will adorn Minter’s ash tree sculpture, transforming the space of the Lynden through acts of cultivation that relate to forging a relationship with nature and invoking axé. The Yoruban concept of axé describes the power, the authority, or the vital force found in all living and non-living things, or the coming to pass of an utterance that affirms out loud that which resonates in our hearts and makes what we speak happen. Those that come before us and after us generate and perpetuate this life force and connection to others. Bodies and things are not separate but relational; they act together to exclude, invite, and regulate particular forms of participation.

Furthermore, we will work with Rudy Medina and Alyx Christensen of the collective Open Kitchen to learn about their project at Lynden’s Cultural Garden. This will engage us in critical conversations on food, home, society, and culture--local and at-large--while cultivating knowledge through a shared space of mutual exchange that tends to and amends our relationship to land and place. Lastly, we will be introduced to HEALING COATS, a project initiated by Ariane King Comer. The “healing coats” were produced by community members and Call & Response artists and bring together cultural and personal symbols of healing. They answer to what relationships we want to establish with the artist, the artisan, the maker, and the community in Milwaukee and beyond using the questions: If you were the messenger of healing, what would you want to do or say? What does it mean to learn about healing from each other?

2021: Cultivation I
Faculty members: Rina Kundu Little, Liz Rex
Additional Instructors: Anna Grosch, Claudia Orjuela
Participating artists: Daniel Minter, Reggie Wilson, Kyoung Ae Cho, Emma Daisy Gertel, Ck Ledesma, Scott Alves Barton, Kellen Abston, Kim Khaira, Angela Kingsawan, Molly Hassler, LaNia Sproles
Art Educators in Residence: Katie Hobday, Sue Pezanoski Browne
The 2021 and 2022 Innovative Educators Institute (IEI) and reconvening meetings will be focused on the theme of cultivation and planned in conjunction with Lynden’s two-year Call and Response Program (CRP) project with artist Daniel Minter, called In the Healing Language of Trees: A Natural Act of Transformation Restructured for Curing Many Ills. The word “cultivation” may conjure up such synonyms as farming, sowing, growing, planting, fostering, developing, supporting, encouraging, and nurturing, among many others. Cultivation is tied to growth and change but also to refinement and civilization, which have excluded people and devasted the land. The IEI and reconvening meetings will explore cultivation's positive transformative qualities in relation to art. Art cultivates by creating new worlds where materials are used to bring to life previously unseen realities and alternative social, cultural, and spatial formations. This IEI uses the social and material practices of art to investigate how to organize, nurture, build, and re-imagine our surroundings differently and in relation to humans and nonhumans. How can art cultivate? How does it transform the world and produce conditions that would support it? Daniel Minter will involve participants in wood carvings to invoke “axé,” the spiritual force that resides in all living things. Furthermore, Minter will ask us to re-imagine art as utilitarian, a resource for individual and collective struggles, and a shared space that enables nurturing and healing. We will join him in practices of worlding which is the ability engender responsibility for futures co-created through making, storying, writing, and researching. He will be joined by Call & Response artists Arianne King Comer, Reggie Wilson, and others. As Minter reminds us, “by sharing space, you make it larger.”

2020: Uprooted
Faculty member: Rina Kundu Little
Participating artists: Kellen Abston, Phoenix Brown, Molly Hassler, Kim Khaira, Jenna Knapp, Sarah Gail Luther, Latrelle Rostant, LaNia Sproles, Ariana Vaeth, and Reggie Wilson.
Art Educators in Residence: Katie Hobday, Sue Pezanoski Browne
The 2020 Innovative Educators Institute focuses on the theme of “uprooted.” We will begin with a consideration of the social and political issues surrounding migration, borders, natural environments, and the importance of transforming local communities through creative production. Uprooted indicates the devastation of forced displacement, and the discord experienced while searching for new homes and opportunities. Art provides unique access to the world of the displaced in which people have stories to tell. Their stories awaken in us the ability to imagine things differently through exchange and dialogue. They allow us to wonder, to encounter, and to build relations of understanding by connecting and learning from one another while constructing ways to make and remake ourselves. Wonder exists in body and mind, “emanating from a particular object, image, or fragment of text,” and crafting the challenge, “What next?” It facilitates interconnected relations and a sense of place as “encounters that hold in them useful anti-colonial practices and narratives.” The theme provides us with an opportunity to grapple with complexities in relation to people and places.

Since the onset of the pandemic and the emergence of national protests against police brutality, systemic racism, and racial terror-- particularly in relation to Black lives-- the theme has also taken on additional meanings in relation to the teaching and learning in classrooms as well as rebuilding respect, equity, and care in communities. What experiences do we want to construct for students? How can we contribute through teaching, advocacy, and community building? Covid-19 reveals that teachers are demonstrating bravery and resilience in the face of harsh realities, initiating new forms of online teaching and learning, and generating a sense of community through continued interactions with children.

How might we reflect and express empathy and solidarity with Black members of our communities? What actions must be taken to address inequities? How can we materially and imaginatively situate historical and contemporary struggles against practices of domination? Answers to such questions require us to create and sustain relationships, look beyond borders, and get involved. We will discuss cultural artifacts that value and document the actions experiences, struggles, and achievements of those who have found their way to new places and spaces where they work to contribute meaningfully within their communities. Such activity connects us with a web of movements and actions that construct modes of emplacement.

2019: Re+stor+ation
Faculty member: Rina Kundu Little
Participating artists: Rosemary Ollison, LaNia Sproles, and others to be announced.
The 2019 Innovative Educators Institute focuses on the theme of restoration. "Repairing," “rebuilding," “reconstructing,” and “returning” are processes associated with restoration; they allow us to reconnect to self, re-imagine others, and rediscover our relationship to the land. The summer lab will use an experiential, interdisciplinary approach to learning while developing skills, confidence, and understanding of the value of place. It will build cooperative learning strategies that involve members of a place in the process of education; enable listening and learning from the community and the land; and facilitate restoration through art-making and myth-making. Rosemary Ollison will be one of the featured artists for the workshop. She is a self-taught artist who creates drawings, sculptures, quilts, jewelry, and environments by repurposing collected materials. Her art often works at a catalyst for well-being with restorative possibilities.

2018: Entanglement
Faculty member: Rina Kundu
Participating artists: Reggie Wilson, Arianne King Comer, Portia Cobb, LaNia Sproles
Entanglement provides a metaphor for a non-hierarchical, reciprocal approach to thought, creativity, and expression—and a dynamic understanding of place as a web of movements, actions, and materials. Entanglements call us into connection, shaping us as we intra-act with people, flora, fauna, objects, structures, and culture. Our learning about entanglement will be grounded in Lynden’s local phenomena, artifacts, and environment in relation to our own experiences, memories, and histories. Using movement, making, and writing, we will explore the fluid and flexible processes of the experiential, the affective, the haptic, and the performative that construct and connect us to place.

2017: Narrating Space: Wandering, Encountering, Dwelling, Resonating
Faculty member: Rina Kundu
Participating artists: Fo Wilson, Reggie Wilson, Colin Matthes, Rose Curley

2016: Emplacement
Faculty member: Rina Kundu
Participating artists: Fo Wilson, Tyanna Buie, Colin Matthes

2015: Movement and Migration
Faculty members: Laura Trafí-Prats/Rina Kundu
Participating artists: Reggie Wilson, Santiago Cucullu, Nirmal Raja

2014: Living Matter
Faculty member: Prof. Laura Trafí-Prats
Participating artists: Linda Wervey Vitamvas, Kevin Giese, Emilie Clark

2013: Attentive Living: Art, Nature and Place
Faculty member: Prof. Laura Trafí-Prats
Participating artists: Roy Staab, Shana McCaw and Brent Budsberg

EDUCATOR DISCOUNTS ON WORKSHOPS
Lynden offers discounts on its workshops on a space-available basis. To view the list of qualifying workshops, and to register for a workshop as an educator, visit our Educators' Portal.


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